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About Traditional Art / Professional Member NimaMale/United States Group :iconprehistory-alive: Prehistory-Alive
Bringing prehistory back to life
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A few of my skeletals will be getting a substantial overhaul as I have come across piles of new data and material that demands a revision. Brachiosaurus paleo-king.deviantart.com/art/… is already largely overhauled. Little did I know that the Smithsonian actually has multiple fragmentary specimens of Brachiosaurus that have never been put on display! Giraffatitan and Lusotitan are also on the list. You find new stuff in museum collections that fills in some gaps and basically your old stuff becomes outdated.

As Scott Hartman and a few others know personally, this is the real fun part of skeletals :XD:

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Paleo-King
Nima
Artist | Professional | Traditional Art
United States
Current Residence: A dinosaur museum/bone bed near you
deviantWEAR sizing preference: Somewhere between Otto Arco and Louis Cyr
Favourite style of art: that's rather self-evident...
Operating System: Anything but Vista!
Skin of choice: mammalian, watertight, preferably soft, hairless and well-insulated
Personal Quote: "It must be new or bust!"

All images are my own copyrights unless explicitly noted otherwise. If you are interested in commissioning work or using any of my images in a paper, book, presentation or website, drop me a line at Paleo_King@hotmail.com.

Website: www.sassani-dinoart.com/

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:iconcarcharodontotitan:
Carcharodontotitan Featured By Owner 1 day ago
Hey Nima, do you know how aquatic predators deal with all of the water they end up swallowing while consuming prey underwater? Do they swallow it or do they somehow expel it? I'm especially curious about marine reptiles, such as crocodiles, pliosaurs, mosasaurs. etc. because sharks and other fish, for example, could possibly use their gills do expel excess water. 
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Professional Traditional Artist
Crocodiles have a tongue flap at the back of the tongue that sticks up to block the throat and keep water out. Not down, but UP, it's part of the actual tongue.

We can only guess at what plesiosaurus, mosasaurs, pliosaurs etc. had going on in their mouths. Probably a similar system. Maybe with grooves on the sides to squeeze the water out if it gets past the flap.
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:iconcarcharodontotitan:
Carcharodontotitan Featured By Owner 1 day ago
Is the tongue flap what keeps water out even as they ingest something?
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
You are gonna have a new friend to draw pretty soon.  Heard about Dreadnoughtus yet? :)  Looks like Lacovara's giant has a name!

fragillimus335.deviantart.com/…
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Professional Traditional Artist
Wow, interesting. From what I recall he told me it was similar to Aeolosaurus so probably very derived end of lithostrotia. I guess we shall see soon.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
A 60-ton Aeolosaurus relative hmmmm...
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, pretty impressive. And apparently more complete than Futalognkosaurus. May be more than 60 tons depending on how the rib heads and the width of the thing turn out.
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(1 Reply)
:iconelsqiubbonator:
I have a question. Why is it that lambeosaurine (crested) hadrosaurs seem to disappear from North America just before end of the Cretaceous, but survive right up to the mass extinction in Asia? And what is the most recent North American lambeosaurine known?
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
That's strange. I was under the impression that Parasaurolophus tubicen was maastrichtian in age. I suspect just in Montana and other northern areas they became rare.
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2014
P. tubicen went extinct in the late Campanian, about 72 mya. The only Maastrichtian  North American lambeosaurine was Hypacrosaurus, which lived up until about 67 mya. 
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