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About Traditional Art / Professional Member NimaMale/United States Group :iconprehistory-alive: Prehistory-Alive
Bringing prehistory back to life
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If you have been paying attention to something other than the disastrous performance of the Broncos in the Super Bowl, you may have heard rumors of this creature. It is by far the most bizarre titanosaur to come out of China (yes even stranger than Ruyangosaurus, Baotianmansaurus, or Dongbeititan).

The paper is phenomenal, and the work of two good friends of mine, grad student Liguo Li and professor Peter Dodson from UPenn, as well as You Hailou, the reigning master of Chinese sauropod research.

Yongjinglong datangi is a mid-sized titanosaur from the Hekou group of early cretaceous Gansu province (home of both Huanghetitan and Daxiatitan), with some of the strangest proportions ever seen. The most obvious fact is that the shoulder blade is HUGE, but also rather slender at the back end, and the coracoid isn't all that big. The crazy-elongate proportions of the shoulder blade are rivaled by only one other sauropod within titanosauria, and barely one or two others outside it. Even compared to the ridiculously elongated (and similarly small-coracoided) "Ultrasauros" shoulder blade of Jim Jensen fame, this thing is extreme. This animal must have had one of the proportionally deepest rib cages on record, but a relatively narrow chest by comparison. And no, it's not closely related to either Huanghetitan or Euhelopus, although there may be common-niche convergences there. The second bizarre feature, the extremely robust and short lower arm with bulky end-processes, is a key feature of very advanced "lithostrotian" titanosaurs - as are the slender teeth found with the specimen. I won't ruin the excitement of its most likely (unpublished!) taxonomic affinities just yet, but suffice it to say, it's not from Opisthocoelicaudiinae, Saltasauridae, Euhelopodidae, Huanghetitanidae, or any of the other titanosauriform families previously known from China - in fact it appears to be most closely related to a group which until now was thought to have absolutely no presence there at all.


This dinosaur was about 60 ft. long (or more, the outline may be seriously underestimating the neck and tail for all we know). With those short legs and deep yet probably narrow belly, it really doesn't look much like anything seen before, alive or extinct. Think of a laterally compressed hippo perhaps... or stick a long neck and tail on an Embolotherium and you might get a similar result. I doubt this animal was in any way aquatic, but it's a safe guess that with that low of a belly clearance off the ground, these guys weren't stomping into steep highlands like Brachiosaurus.

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Paleo-King
Nima
Artist | Professional | Traditional Art
United States
Current Residence: A dinosaur museum/bone bed near you
deviantWEAR sizing preference: Somewhere between Otto Arco and Louis Cyr
Favourite style of art: that's rather self-evident...
Operating System: Anything but Vista!
Skin of choice: mammalian, watertight, preferably soft, hairless and well-insulated
Personal Quote: "It must be new or bust!"

All images are my own copyrights unless explicitly noted otherwise. If you are interested in commissioning work or using any of my images in a paper, book, presentation or website, drop me a line at Paleo_King@hotmail.com.

Website: www.sassani-dinoart.com/

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:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Apr 1, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Hello Nima. how are you doin. I have a question about saurpod necks, since i wanna become a totall dinosaur artist with good accuracy i have a question about this apatosaurus from safari. it it possible that diplodocids could raise their necks in that angle or is is oudated by modern standrads. Since i know they couldnt do the swan neck thing likle old pics show i have thought much of this. It seem possible since they were not totally stiff.

stores.homestead.com/hstrial-D…

Best regards Hellraptor
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Apr 1, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
This pose (at least the front of the neck) is bordering on the limits of possibility (of course depending on which species of Apatosaurus, perhaps the longer-necked A.ajax could do this). But a neck this steep is not "habitual posture" for Apatosaurus of any species. There was some upcurve to the neck, I don't accept the "stiff-as-a-ruler" necks of Kent Stevens. But since the vertebrae were short and relatively straight as far as the angles of the condyles and cotyles, the upcurve was not likely to be this steep. Since the zygapophyses were rather large relative to the short length of the vertebrae, curving it up too far could result in dislocation as the condyles slip out of the cotyles.

The model has one other big flaw, namely how wiggly the tail is. Generally diplodocid tails were stiff in the middle (in fact in the Pittsburgh specimen of D. carnegiei, four of the mid-caudals are fused into a single piece!), it was only the end of the tail that could undulate like that, and only when swung. They had amphiplatyan caudal vertebrae, which made for less flexibility than the ball-and-socket tails of titanosaurs.
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:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Apr 1, 2014  Student Traditional Artist

Ok, thats what i thought aswell, i know that they could lower and raise their necks but it seems that bending it like that would be like you said, on the edge. I also ask because when i draw a saurpod like this, its alwways the tail that falls out side the edge of the paper so i was was in a way hoping that it would be correct so that i could the the whole animal showing.

 


So basicly jurassic sauropods could not bend their tails like that like Diplodocids, Macronians i know but Cretacious sauropods could. I know that sauropodtails were stiff in a similar way like tetatnurans and that they were very limited in movement.

They worked like a whip, cant move unless yoy swing it.



Just askning twice since i hate to re-do a Picture ;)


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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Apr 1, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Macronarians include titanosaurs so most of those are cretaceous.

Diplodocid tails were limited in their flexibility by the fact that the neural spines at the base of the tail are so tall. The tendons that attached to them laterally made the tail less flexible but helped hold it straight. They needed to be this way to hold up such a big tail.

Some macronarians with amphiplatyan tails (such as brachiosaurs) may have had more flexibility to the tail, since it wasn't so big and heavy and the neural spines weren't as high. But titanosaurs would have been more flexible. Especially the derived ones.
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(1 Reply)
:icondarklord86:
I love your work!
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Mar 4, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks very much :D
Yours is pretty impressive too!
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:icondarklord86:
Your welcome, and thanks!
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Mar 8, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Just curious, you have any work relating to the Qin (not Qing) or Han periods? I find those early times pretty interesting.
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(1 Reply)
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Feb 26, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Reason, sit-ups, and child abuse. Yup, that pretty much says it all. Well maybe without so much of the reason part. :p

BTW notice how Man of Steel was a total flop and its successors aren't likely to fare much better: metro.co.uk/2014/02/26/5-reaso…
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