Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo



Details

Submitted on
July 1, 2011
Image Size
3.0 MB
Resolution
5672×4576
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
6,364
Favourites
82 (who?)
Comments
37
×
Andesaurus delgadoi - revised by Paleo-King Andesaurus delgadoi - revised by Paleo-King
FORGOTTEN GIANTS: species #3 - Andesaurus delgadoi

*Now revised with more accurate speculative sacrals and stouter limbs - and re-scaled.* The previous version was far too big at 30m (100ft.), a bogus figure which has been published many times over in commercial dino-books - based on a careful re-analysis of the fossil measurements, Andesaurus can not have been larger than 20m (66ft.)

This restoration is also the basis of an amazing new 3D model by MrGorsh [link] which shows how even relatively slender titanosaurs could be bulky.

Location: El Chocón, Argentina (Río Limay Formation)
Time: Albian-Cenomanian epochs (transition from Early to Late Cretaceous)
Length: 66ft. (20m)
Probable mass: ~25 tons
--------------------------

The midsize basal titanosaur Andesaurus delgadoi, fully restored in hi-fi profile and frontal views for the FIRST TIME ever. The skeletal art is also the first ever done for this species.

Andesaurus was described in 1991, but since then very little research has been done on it. It's the founding member of the family Andesauridae, one of the most primitive families of titanosaurs - yet despite being the namesake of the dubious family that once contained its famed contemporary Argentinosaurus, it's obscure and still not well-understood. It was long-bodied, with tall neural spines on its back (which was probably close to horizontal) and very robust hips. It's not an extreme design for a titanosaur - its elegance lies in its subtlety. This animal was the forerunner of all subsequent titanosaur body designs. It's classed as the most primitve true titanosaur in most scientific papers and cladistic analyses, though that distinction likely belongs to a much earlier animal, perhaps Janenschia.

Despite being only a medium-sized sauropod, Andesaurus has often been labeled in books and on websites as a colossus verging on 30m long. In reality, the bones indicate a far smaller animal, and are dwarfed by those of real 100+ footers like Argentinosaurus and Puertasaurus.

Missing bones whose shapes can be reasonably well-approximated are shaded, I did not figure speculative neck bones since we literally have no clue what they would have looked like. Skeletal and accompanying diagrams of specific vertebrae are based on photographs of the fossils and on scale diagrams in Salgado et. al. 1997 and Mannion and Calvo, 2011.

References:

Calvo, J.O. & Bonaparte, J.F. 1991. Andesaurus delgadoi nov. gen. et nov. sp. (Saurischia, Sauropoda) a titanosaurid dinosaur from the Río Limay Formation (Albian-Cenomanian), Neuquén, Argentina.] Ameghiniana. 28: 303-310. [In Spanish]

Mannion, P.D. & Calvo, J.O. 2011. Anatomy of the basal titanosaur (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) Andesaurus delgadoi from the mid-Cretaceous (Albian–early Cenomanian) Río Limay Formation, Neuquén Province, Argentina: implications for titanosaur systematics. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society [link]
Add a Comment:
 
:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Odd, considering "delgado" is Spanish for "thin", and this was a sauropod. XD
Reply
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, it's named after a guy with the last name Delgado who apparently helped discover it.

That said, it IS pretty thin as far as titanosaurs go (most are basically walking whales). The basal ones were generally on the more slender side, and Andesaurus was not very huge among those.
Reply
:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Walking whales... Pretty much the best way to describe the Futalognkosaurids, like Argentinosaurus. XD
Reply
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Nope, Argentinosaurus is NOT a lognkosaurian. It's a more basal form, similar to Andesaurus. And if you look closely at my reconstruction, it's more slender than Futalognkosaurus, Puertasaurus, etc. The vertebrae were the classic cross-shaped type common in basal titanosaurs, not the wide double-anvil wedge shape you see in lognkosaurians. So the rib cage was a bit more modest.
Reply
:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh. *headdesk* Whatever wiki-vandal that told me that should be hanged, flogged, then hanged again! (Cookie if you get the Merlin reference!)
Reply
:icongogosardina:
Gogosardina Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I wonder who originally inflated Ande's size and when?

IIRC Lessem and Glut provided a very modest size estimate back in 1993 (in the Dinosaur Society Dinosaur Encylopedia, with Tracy Ford''s skeletal silhouette).
Reply
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Blame can be placed squarely at Dougal Dixon's feet. :XD: Though I'm not sure he's the first one to make such claims of a 30m Andesaurus. Being a popular author, but not a paleontologist, he's been known to exaggerate such things in the past (though it's pretty rare).
Reply
:icongogosardina:
Gogosardina Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Hey, did you know that Jobaria is "a titanosaurid that is a mix of different animals"? It was found in Tanzania by the Germans and "named after the great German palaeontologist Werner Janensch."

Who woulda thunk it?!
Reply
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Jobaria is not a titanosaur and it was not named after Janensch. You're probably talking about Janenschia. Jobaria is a totally different animal, it's a basal sauropod similar to cetiosaurs.

As for Janenschia, it's not a mix of different animals. It WAS once thrown into Gigantosaurus (as was Malawisaurus) as well as Tornieria. But it's not related to either of those animals. Janenschia, as it's understood today, is based on a number of different-sized individuals, but they are all recognizably the same species of titanosauriform.
Reply
:icongogosardina:
Gogosardina Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Heh - I was quoting Dixon 2006 :P
Reply
Add a Comment: